Atypical white trash rock

Sliding out of a mud-soaked vehicle of trashy blues-rock, Zen Guerilla make knees shake.

With the physical intimidation of 6’7" lead singer Marcus Durant and his coif that makes fro combs’ melt combined with frenetic doses of blistering rock, they have the equipment to cause trembling.

But do they have the talent?

"You have to see us live. Then it’s all pretty self-explanatory," says bassist Carl Home.

Sticking to a simple musical recipe, Zen Guerilla bake their cake with a foundation of rock ‘n’ roll and frost it with blues and an array of colourful soul sprinkles.

" Our music isn’t a vessel to solve world problems," he begins. "That’s not why we play music. We play because we love playing music. We still enjoy just jamming, now we’ve perfected it so we can write a song."

With 12 years of practice under Home’s and guitarist Rich Millman’s belts, they have worked out any kinks in their fuzzy, energetic brand of rock and roll.

Their latest offering,Trance State in Tongues, is a collection of their finest concoctions, neatly woven together in a seamless package.

"The next record [will have] a little more of the psychedelic and soulful stuff," Home says.

Recording 26 tracks, from which only 12 appear on Trance State, Zen Guerilla and Sub Pop Records opted for a thematic approach.

"This record was a lot of harder rock songs."

Most audiences eat the hard stuff like candy and are continually being treated by the often-touring quartet.

On the road since August, Zen Guerilla are currently traipsing across the states with fuzzy distortion rockers Nebula and The Go. Far from strangers to the pleasures and perils of life in a touring van, they always enjoy trips to Europe.

"Audiences over there are completely receptive," he starts. "You’re playing almost every night, thirty shows with one day off kind of thing.

"In Europe there seems to be a lot of musically educated people in the audience. They’re fascinated with American music and they’ll have a lot of questions about it in general."

With the warmest receptions in Germany and Spain, Zen Guerilla is used to active, eager audiences.

To strut your stuff, check them out at the Republik April 6.

Home has only one request:

"No bunnies at the show. Unless they’re obviously caged and sedated. I know they’re evil."

 

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