Movie Review: Sky Captain a blast from the past

Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow has used the most modern of technology to create a futuristic past from past visions of the future. Certainly not the most straightforward of descriptions, owing mostly to the English language’s insufficient number of verb tenses, but it’s clearly what director/writer/computer animator Kerry Conran was aiming for. He’s… Continue reading Movie Review: Sky Captain a blast from the past

Movie Review: More than love for Wimbledon

From the producers of Bridget Jones’ Diary, Love Actually, Johnny English and Shaun of the Dead, comes the new romantic comedy Wimbledon. So it’s not surprising the movie comes off like Bridget Jones on espn. Peter Colt (Paul Bettany) is the least likely candidate to win Wimbledon. Lizzie Bradbury (Kirsten Dunst) is America’s John McEnroe… Continue reading Movie Review: More than love for Wimbledon

Of the Fields, Lately could use a trim

Ever felt your emotions spiraling out of control-laughing one minute, but crying the next? Of the Fields, Lately, this season’s first offering by Theatre Calgary takes its audience on such a journey of incongruity, jumping from scenes of intense drama to inane humor within a blink of an eye. Written by one of Canada’s premier… Continue reading Of the Fields, Lately could use a trim

Toasters in the ska oven

Throughout the history of music numerous bands have made their impact on the music industry by creating a new style of music. Rarely are people fortunate enough to witness these movements begin, never mind watching these bands before they become cannon. All people are left with are those “important” albums. When ska was reformed in… Continue reading Toasters in the ska oven

FilmFest Review: Investigations Into the Invisible World

Ambient music group Sigur Ros aren’t all that normal. They sing in a made-up language and occasionally refuse to title their songs. Bjork is undoubtedly strange. It’s actually pretty difficult to come up with some aspect of her personality that could be called normal. After seeing Jean-Michel Roux’s documentary Investigations Into the Invisible World, a… Continue reading FilmFest Review: Investigations Into the Invisible World

FilmFest Review: Savage Island

Savage Island has won best horror film in at least two film festivals. It has also been rejected by the Vancouver and Toronto film fests, making Calgary its Canadian premiere. Looks like Vancouver and Toronto did the right thing in passing on this one. Shot on low-grade digital video, Savage Island doesn’t wear its limited… Continue reading FilmFest Review: Savage Island

FilmFest Review: American Short Films

Harlem’s low budget aerospace program, the intrigue of low-budget filmmaking, and the cold-blooded murder of John Stamos provide the highlights in this imaginative collection of shorts. As with any assemblage of shorts, some are stronger than others, but the good easily outway the bad in the first set of American shorts at the ciff.The top… Continue reading FilmFest Review: American Short Films

Movie Review: Nothing

Canadian director Vincenzo Natali of Cube fame has brought us another surreal existential displacement flick in the delightfully engaging Nothing. Made by Natali in 2003, casts David Hewlett and Andrew Miller as best friends in the midst of a twisted and unrelenting urban Toronto. The two live together as childhood-friends-turned-roommates in a tiny house sandwiched… Continue reading Movie Review: Nothing

Filmfest: After The Apocalypse is devestatingly good

As the old saying goes: A picture is worth a thousand words. This couldn’t be truer than with director Yasuaki Nakajima’s first feature length film, After the Apocalypse, a post apocalyptic drama where all of the people left alive after World War Three have lost the ability to speak. Dialogue, in the minds of many,… Continue reading Filmfest: After The Apocalypse is devestatingly good