No small goodbye

After 13 years, a chapter in independent Canadian music is coming to an end. Hailing from Alberta, the smalls have finally decided that it’s time to throw in the towel as a band.

It all started in 1988 when members of the smalls met while studying jazz at Grant MacEwan College. Soon, the band became a full-time commitment and the members dropped out of school to further their musical careers. In 1990 the band released the first of four albums, which they followed with extensive touring.

With 11 years and four albums under their belts, the smalls have become more successful and sold more albums than many major
artists.

"In Canada, there is only so far you can go as an independent band," says bassist Corby Lund. "We order our own shirts, make our own phone calls, drive our own van and book our own shows. After a while it gets to a point where you can’t grow any further."

Some of their fans believe that the smalls are against signing to a record label.

"A lot of people ask us why we don’t want to be on a label," says Lund. "But that’s actually not the situation."

Lund describes that the band always tried to get the promotional and financial backing of a label, but only as long as the label didn’t hamper their style. "We’re really happy with what we’ve done, but it’s frustrating because the record companies in Canada are pretty conservative."

As the band nears its end, the bassist reminisces over some of the highlights of their career.

"We were one of the first western bands to play in Bosnia after the war," says Lund. "It kind of made us feel like cultural ambassadors."

This is a true testament to the smalls’ career as one that spans boundaries and surpasses the limitations of being independent.

They’re also looking at releasing some projects after they disband.

"We’re thinking about recording our last couple of shows, and maybe releasing a live album and video," says Lund. The band also has a documentary scheduled to be released that will highlight their career.

However, the end of the smalls is also not to be taken as the end of its members, as all plan on further pursuing their musical careers.

"Everyone’s been talking about doing more stuff," says Lund. "Some of us just don’t know what."

nbsp;    After 13 years, a chapter in independent Canadian music is coming to an end. Hailing from Alberta, the smalls have finally decided that it’s time to throw in the towel as a band.

It all started in 1988 when members of the smalls met while studying jazz at Grant MacEwan College. Soon, the band became a full-time commitment and the members dropped out of school to further their musical careers. In 1990 the band released the first of four albums, which they followed with extensive touring.

With 11 years and four albums under their belts, the smalls have become more successful and sold more albums than many major
artists.

"In Canada, there is only so far you can go as an independent band," says bassist Corby Lund. "We order our own shirts, make our own phone calls, drive our own van and book our own shows. After a while it gets to a point where you can’t grow any further."

Some of their fans believe that the smalls are against signing to a record label.

"A lot of people ask us why we don’t want to be on a label," says Lund. "But that’s actually not the situation."

Lund describes that the band always tried to get the promotional and financial backing of a label, but only as long as the label didn’t hamper their style. "We’re really happy with what we’ve done, but it’s frustrating because the record companies in Canada are pretty conservative."

As the band nears its end, the bassist reminisces over some of the highlights of their career.

"We were one of the first western bands to play in Bosnia after the war," says Lund. "It kind of made us feel like cultural ambassadors."

This is a true testament to the smalls’ career as one that spans boundaries and surpasses the limitations of being independent.

They’re also looking at releasing some projects after they disband.

"We’re thinking about recording our last couple of shows, and maybe releasing a live album and video," says Lund. The band also has a documentary scheduled to be released that will highlight their career.

However, the end of the smalls is also not to be taken as the end of its members, as all plan on further pursuing their musical careers.

"Everyone’s been talking about doing more stuff," says Lund. "Some of us just don’t know what."

For example, Corby has been working on his side project, The Corb Lund Band, for the past while. As an old-school country act, it will be very different from the music of the smalls.

The smalls made an impact few bands will ever realize over their careers. Fans will surely remember that the band created a benchmark in Canadian music.

"We can look back on the whole thing and honestly say that the people liked us for our music," says Lund. "And I think that’s pretty cool."

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.